Jeter hit by pitch on hand, day-to-day

Jeter hit by pitch on hand, day-to-day

NEW YORK -- The thud of baseball hitting bone may have been something awful, but -- no surprise here -- Derek Jeter said he will be all right.

The Yankees shortstop was hit on the left hand by a Daniel Cabrera fastball in the third inning of Tuesday's 12-2 loss to the Orioles, forcing him to leave the game.

X-rays were negative after an examination by team physician Dr. Stuart Hershon. Jeter was diagnosed with a contusion and has been listed as day-to-day.

"It'll be fine," Jeter said. "Obviously, it doesn't feel good, but I should be all right for [Wednesday]."

With two outs in the third inning and Baltimore leading, 9-0, Cabrera went up and inside with a 2-1 fastball to Jeter, striking him on the left hand. Jeter spun back toward the area behind home plate, holding his left hand tucked against his side as manager Joe Girardi and trainer Gene Monahan rushed out.

Wincing through a brief examination on the field and a few words with Girardi, Jeter walked off the field, flipping his helmet at the bat rack before disappearing down the dugout runway.

"Fortunately, it's not broken," Jeter said.

He was replaced by pinch-runner Alberto Gonzalez, who remained in the game at shortstop.

Jeter missed six games in April with a strained left quadriceps, and the scuffling Yankees can ill afford to lose any more of their marquee players for extended periods of time, especially after welcoming Alex Rodriguez back to the lineup on Tuesday, but falling a season-low five games under .500 at 20-25.

Jeter is batting .312 with two home runs in 39 games, and Girardi seemed to be leaving the door open for Jeter to play in the second game of the three-game series against Baltimore on Wednesday.

"It's Derek Jeter," Girardi said. "There's not too many days he sits out. My gut tells me he's going to be pretty sore. But there's a lot of days that people probably thought Derek Jeter wouldn't play, and he goes out there."

Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.